Skip to Content

Lindsey Street Corridor Project

Now that the Lindsey Bridge over I-35 has opened, some residents have asked about the Lindsey Street Corridor Project on West Lindsey. The community is understandably concerned about the merchants on Lindsey and the City also regrets the inconvenience to drivers and the businesses on Lindsey. It is a challenge for cities, and for state departments of transportation, nationwide to be able to do necessary work on roads and streets where businesses are located. There really is no easy way to do a major construction project and not impact the area around the construction. We wanted to explain a little more about this project and why it was needed.

The $40 million Lindsey Street Corridor Project between 24th Avenue SW and Berry Road is the largest single transportation project ever undertaken by the City of Norman. Norman voters approved bond funding for the project in August 2012. Local funds are being used to leverage nearly $15 million in federal transportation funds for the project. (That saves Norman taxpayers those $15 million.) Construction of the project was estimated in August 2012 to require 12-18 months. Construction of the project began on July 5, 2016 or approximately 12 months ago. Substantial completion of the project is expected in Fall 2017. In comparison to similar, complex municipal projects in other parts of the United States, the timeline for the Lindsey Street Corridor Project is considered to be average or above average. Contract incentives have been made available for early completion.
There were three key reasons that the Norman community undertook the Lindsey Street Corridor Project: (1) Lindsey Street was the No. 1 most congested corridor in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area; (2) Lindsey Street near McGee Drive was the No. 1 rated flooding problem in Norman, commonly referred to as “Lake McGee”; and (3) Lindsey Street had a traffic accident rate three times higher than the national average for similar roadways. All of these problems will be addressed with the current project, not to mention the multi-modal transportation enhancements such as on-street bike lanes, continuous accessible sidewalks, bus turn-out lanes, mid-block pedestrian crossings and interconnected traffic signals. The Lindsey Street Corridor serves as the gateway to the University of Oklahoma and, as such, will receive extensive aesthetic improvements including triple-canopy landscaping, wayfinding signage, Cherokee Gothic columns to reflect the OU architecture, concrete stamped/colored intersections and street furniture.
Multiple construction crews have been working on the Lindsey Street Corridor Project 5-6 days per week and up to 12 hours per day since the project began 12 months ago. Nearly half of the project costs involve stormwater improvements.The new stormwater pipelines and box culverts are constructed underground, up to 30 feet deep in places. In addition to the underground construction, the new stormwater pipelines are being installed up to 
one mile north and south of Lindsey Street. These may be some of the reasons that fewer construction crews have been visible to drivers along Lindsey Street during the previous twelve months. Most of the stormwater pipeline installations are complete, so more road construction will be observed along Lindsey Street in coming weeks and months.
Before the project began, we met with the Lindsey Street merchants to explain the project, our commitment to keep Lindsey open during the project, and our incentives to try to expedite it as much as possible. For example, we make sure businesses have drives or temporary drives at all times so there is access to the businesses, and some driveway pouring has taken place at night during non-business hours. 
We attend a meeting with the merchants monthly to help keep them apprised, and issues are addressed if they come up between meetings. We created and update a website to keep merchants and the community informed: http://www.lindseystreetnorman.com/. We provided the merchants a Road Construction Survival Guide with tips to help them during the project.
Our City Council passed a Resolution in support of the merchants on October 11, 2016. In it, the Council waived fees for temporary signage and banners to help merchants promote their businesses. 
The City has partnered with the Norman Chamber on promotional events on Lindsey Street.
When the project is completed, Lindsey will be a multi-model, beautiful gateway to our community and the University. 

LARGEST SINGLE TRANSPORTATION PROJECT

The $40 million Lindsey Street Corridor Project between 24th Avenue SW and Berry Road is the largest single transportation project ever undertaken by the City of Norman. Norman voters approved bond funding for the project in August 2012. Local funds are being used to leverage nearly $15 million in federal transportation funds for the project. (That saves Norman taxpayers those $15 million.) Construction of the project was estimated in August 2012 to require 12-18 months. Construction of the project began on July 5, 2016. Substantial completion of the project is expected in fall 2017. In comparison to similar, complex municipal projects in other parts of the United States, the timeline for the Lindsey Street Corridor Project is considered to be average or above average. Contract incentives have been made available for early completion.

REASONS FOR PROJECT

There were three key reasons that the Norman community undertook the Lindsey Street Corridor Project:

  • Lindsey Street was the No. 1 most congested corridor in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area;
  • Lindsey Street near McGee Drive was the No. 1 rated flooding problem in Norman, commonly referred to as “Lake McGee”; and
  • Lindsey Street had a traffic accident rate three times higher than the national average for similar roadways.

All of these problems will be addressed with the current project, not to mention the multi-modal transportation enhancements such as on-street bike lanes, continuous accessible sidewalks, bus turn-out lanes, mid-block pedestrian crossings and interconnected traffic signals. The Lindsey Street Corridor serves as the gateway to the University of Oklahoma and, as such, will receive extensive aesthetic improvements including triple-canopy landscaping, wayfinding signage, Cherokee Gothic columns to reflect the OU architecture, concrete stamped/colored intersections and street furniture. (See the photo below of the new bridge over Imhoff Creek.)

New Lindsey Bridge over Imhoff Creek

WORK TAKING PLACE OUT OF SIGHT

Multiple construction crews have been working on the Lindsey Street Corridor Project 5-6 days per week and up to 12 hours per day since the project began 12 months ago. Nearly half of the project costs involve stormwater improvements.The new stormwater pipelines and box culverts are constructed underground, up to 30 feet deep in places. In addition to the underground construction, the new stormwater pipelines are being installed up to one mile north and south of Lindsey Street. These may be some of the reasons that fewer construction crews have been visible to drivers along Lindsey Street during the previous twelve months. Most of the stormwater pipeline installations are complete, so more road construction will be observed along Lindsey Street in coming weeks and months.

WORKING WITH LINDSEY STREET MERCHANTS

Before the project began, we met with the Lindsey Street merchants to explain the project, our commitment to keep Lindsey open during the project, and our incentives to try to expedite it as much as possible. For example, we make sure businesses have drives or temporary drives at all times so there is access to the businesses. Some of that driveway pouring has taken place at night during non-business hours. 

City staff attend a meeting with the merchants monthly to help keep them apprised, and issues are addressed if they come up between meetings. The City created and update a website to keep merchants and the community informed: http://www.lindseystreetnorman.com. The merchants were provided a Road Construction Survival Guide with tips to help them during the project.

The Norman City Council passed a Resolution in support of the merchants on October 11, 2016. In it, the Council waived fees for temporary signage and banners to help merchants promote their businesses. 

The City has partnered with the Norman Chamber of Commerce on promotional events on Lindsey Street.

When the project is completed, Lindsey will be a multi-modal, beautiful gateway to our community and the University. 

Lindsey Street Corridor Project Flyer

(Updated July 2017)